News & Updates

Ridgehaven Works “Perfectly” for Reber Family

June-2-2016

Ridgehaven home buyers Ben and Jessica-1Brand New Homes in Southwest Las Vegas!

When Ben and Jessica Reber visited Warmington’s Ridgehaven community, they knew they were home. The beautiful model home they toured was within their budget and the perfect size for the new family of four, inside and out. Plus, the idyllic gated community, which is located in Southwest Las Vegas, is in the area they wanted to live in.

“It all just worked out perfectly,” said Jessica.

The Rebers moved in to their brand-new home on March 1, 2016, which they share with a teenage son and daughter. Not only was it their first home as a couple, the Rebers were one of the first residents to move into the family-friendly community.

The couple chose the Hillcrest, Plan 3 at Ridgehaven, which is the most spacious home available. At approximately 2,393 sq. ft., the two-story home has three bedrooms – two upstairs and one downstairs – and three baths, and also offers a covered patio and two-space garage.

The outside of the home is brown stucco with brick and a Spanish tile roof, which blends seamlessly into the surrounding desert landscape. The inside is impeccably-designed with granite countertops and dark espresso cabinetry in the kitchen, and hardwood laminate flooring the couple chose, which “came out beautifully,” Jessica said.

Green-living and energy conservation is important to Warmington, and each home in the Ridgehaven community is equipped with energy-efficient appliances. The Rebers’ home included a stainless-steel GE Profile refrigerator.

The driveway and patio feature paving stones instead of a solid concrete slab, which was an included upgrade.

“It looks upscale and classy and adds a lot of character to the home,” said Jessica.

The couple also chose the optional upstairs loft, which is their family room where they watch movies on their large screen TV and play games. The home also features spacious ceilings, which reach approximately 12-feet high.

Another perk of living at Ridgehaven, Jessica says, is living close enough to the 215 Beltway to be convenient, but far enough away to not hear the traffic. The family also likes living within walking distance of the new and exciting The Gramercy, a luxury urban village that combines luxury highrise residences, apartments, beautiful light-filled lofts, Class A office space, amenity-filled courtyards, and high-end retail including restaurants, a coffee shop, a nail salon and a gym.

The brand-new gated community, which offers a community pool with cabanas, is currently celebrating its grand opening and homes are now selling! Floor plans offer 3 -5 bedrooms, 2.5 -4 Baths, and range from 2,056-2,393 sq. ft. Prices start from the low $270,000s.

Ridgehaven is located at 9353 Briar Bridge Avenue (Oquendo Road and Fort Apache Road) in Las Vegas. Model homes are open from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. daily, except for Wednesday from 1-6 p.m.

For more information, call (877) 930-5599 or visit Ridgehaven.

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May All Roads Lead to Home: Announcing New Phases In All Locations.

May-14-2013

May All Roads Lead to Home: Announcing New Phases in all Locatons.

It is May and spring is in full swing! For many, this is the perfect season to find a brand new home. As we ease into the summer months, we’d like to invite you to visit one of our new neighborhoods. We have an impressive selection of homes with new phases being introduced this month in all locations!

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IN THE NEWS: Housing Passes a Milestone

July-12-2012

Source: The Wall Street Journal.
July 11, 2012

The housing market has turned—at last.

The U.S. finally has moved beyond attention-grabbing predictions from housing “experts” that housing is bottoming. The numbers are now convincing.
Nearly seven years after the housing bubble burst, most indexes of house prices are bending up. “We finally saw some rising home prices,” S&P’s David Blitzer said a few weeks ago as he reported the first monthly increase in the slow-moving S&P/Case-Shiller house-price data after seven months of declines.

The U.S. finally has moved beyond attention-grabbing predictions from housing “experts” that housing is bottoming. The numbers are now convincing.

Nearly seven years after the housing bubble burst, most indexes of house prices are bending up. “We finally saw some rising home prices,” S&P’s David Blitzer said a few weeks ago as he reported the first monthly increase in the slow-moving S&P/Case-Shiller house-price data after seven months of declines.

Nearly 10% more existing homes were sold in May than in the same month a year earlier, many purchased by investors who plan to rent them for now and sell them later, an important sign of an inflection point. In something of a surprise, the inventory of existing homes for sale has fallen close to the normal level of six months’ worth despite all the foreclosed homes that lenders own. The fraction of homes that are vacant is at its lowest level since 2006.

The reduced inventory of unsold homes is key, says Mark Fleming, chief economist at CoreLogic, a housing data-analysis firm. For the past couple of years, house prices have risen in the spring and then slumped; the declining supply of houses for sale is reason to believe that won’t happen again this year, he says.

Builders began work on 26% more single-family homes in May 2012 than the depressed levels of May 2011. The stock of unsold newly built homes is back to 2005 levels. In each of the past four quarters, housing construction has added to economic growth. In the first quarter, it accounted for 0.4 percentage points of the meager 1.9% growth rate.

“Even with the overall economy slowing,” Wells Fargo Securities economists said, cautiously, in a note to clients, “the budding recovery in the housing market appears to be gradually gaining momentum.”

Economists aren’t always right, but on this at least they agree: A new Wall Street Journal survey of forecasters found 44 believe the housing market has reached its bottom; only three don’t. (The full results of the Journal’s July survey will be released at 2pm ET)

Housing is still far from healthy despite the Federal Reserve’s efforts to resuscitate it by helping to push mortgage rates to extraordinary lows: 3.62% for a 30-year loan, according to Freddie Mac’s latest survey. Single-family housing starts, though up, remain 60% below the 2002 pre-bubble pace. Americans’ equity in homes is $2 trillion, or 25%, less than it was in 2002 and half what it was at the peak. More than one in every four mortgage borrowers still has a loan bigger than the value of the house, though rising home prices are reducing that fraction slowly.

Still, the upturn in housing is a milestone, a particularly welcome one amid a distressing dearth of jobs. For some time, housing has been one of the biggest causes of economic weakness. It has now—barely—moved to the plus side. “A little tail wind is a lot better than a headwind,” says economist Chip Case, the “Case” in Case-Shiller.

From here on, housing is unlikely to drag the U.S. economy down further. It will instead reflect the strength or weakness of the overall economy: The more jobs, the more confident Americans are about keeping their jobs, the more they are willing to buy houses. “Manufacturing had led growth and construction had lagged,” JPMorgan Chase economists said last week.”Now the roles are reversed: Manufacturing growth has slowed as private construction comes to life.”

Plenty could go wrong. The biggest threat is a large shadow inventory of unsold homes, homes which owners won’t put on the market because they are underwater, homes that will be foreclosed eventually and homes owned by lenders. They have been trickling onto the market, slowed in part by government efforts to delay foreclosures; a flood could reverse the recent rise in prices. Or the still-dysfunctional mortgage market could get worse. Or overly zealous regulators or a post-election change in government policy could unsettle mortgage lenders or home buyers.

But the housing bust is over.

See the article here >>

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